Recurrent cerebellar abscess secondary to cranial dermal sinus associated with dermoid cyst in children

Authors

  • Marcelo Volpon Santos Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
  • Danilo Jorge Pinho Deriggi Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
  • Guilherme Gozzoli Podolsky Gondim Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
  • Maria Celia Cervi Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
  • Ricardo Santos de Oliveira Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.29327/apn.v1i1(September-December).21

Keywords:

Cerebellar abscess, Dermal sinus tract, Dermoid cyst, Posterior fossa

Abstract

Background: Posterior fossa dermoid cysts are rare, benign lesions whose diagnosis can be quite challenging because of their slow growth and subsequent paucity of symptoms. We present herein an unusual case of recurrent cerebellar abscesses induced by an adjacent extradural dermoid cyst with a complete occipital dermal sinus.

Methods: The authors report the case of a 20-month-old girl who presented with signs of acutely raised intracranial pressure and whose head scans showed a left cerebellar hemisphere abscess associated with obstructive hydrocephalus. The patient was treated initially with an external ventricular drain, followed by burr-hole aspiration of the abscess and long-term

antibiotics. Since the cerebellar abscess recurred, a posterior fossa craniotomy was performed and gross total resection of the lesion along with the dermal sinus tract and abscess contents was achieved. Histopathological analysis confirmed a dermoid tumor.

Conclusions: The occurrence of recurrent cerebellar abscesses must always rise up the suspicion of an associated dermoid cyst. Neuroradiological scans should be carefully evaluated in search for this lesion. Once the diagnosis is established, radical resection of the cyst, sinus tract and infectious components is the treatment of choice.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Marcelo Volpon Santos, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Danilo Jorge Pinho Deriggi, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Guilherme Gozzoli Podolsky Gondim, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

 

Maria Celia Cervi, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Ricardo Santos de Oliveira, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Published

2019-08-10 — Updated on 2019-08-10

How to Cite

1.
Santos MV, Deriggi DJP, Gondim GGP, Cervi MC, de Oliveira RS. Recurrent cerebellar abscess secondary to cranial dermal sinus associated with dermoid cyst in children. Arch Pediat Neurosurg [Internet]. 2019Aug.10 [cited 2021Feb.26];1(1(September-December):2-7. Available from: http://www.archpedneurosurg.com.br/pkp/index.php/sbnped2019/article/view/21

Most read articles by the same author(s)

1 2 > >>